INTO A STUDY [ BETWEEN VENUS AND MARS ]
Paul X. Rutz with Neuroscientist Amanda Hampton Wray

Be a Subject in a Neuroscience Study at the Opening Reception

This one-of-a-kind installation reveals paintings designed both as a coherent body of artwork and as scientific stimuli. When you enter, you become part of an experiment.

Opening

Saturday, October 27, 2018
6-9pm

INTO A STUDY is both an art installation and a carefully planned neuroscience study. It began in early 2017 when painter Paul Rutz called neuroscientist Amanda Hampton Wray with a question about how to study the ways people view new paintings. After more than a year spent debating, compromising, fundraising and building a stellar team, that question has blossomed into an immersive exhibit using state-of-the-art research technology to transform the gallery experience.

At the opening—one night only—visitors to Ford Gallery will become subjects in a special data collection event. Many will be fitted with biometric equipment, and all will be shown a series of precisely crafted paintings designed both as a coherent body of art and as stimuli for a neuroscience study.

This is not art inspired by science or vice versa. The exhibit practices both art and science together, which is no small feat! Merging the two cultures has been a difficult yet rewarding process, a dialogue full of give and take—and learning—on both sides. This is a growing niche for art, not only as a site for the artist’s self expression, but, importantly, as a guide for how to engage with the world differently.

Immediately after participating in the study, viewers can enjoy a Q and A with the collaborators and see behind-the-scenes video of how it all came together. Next year the exhibit will be tweaked before it travels to Purdue University and beyond.

A Note on the Subject Matter by Paul X. Rutz

Our symbols for “female” and “male” come from the ancient Romans, but they don’t reference the level-headed Minerva and Apollo, the gods of wisdom, art and self control. Instead they refer to Venus and Mars, the gods of sex and war. The “female” symbol depicts the handheld mirror of Venus, while the “male” circle with arrow represents the shield and spear of the war god.

Looking at those symbols on bathroom doors got me curious about our culture’s parallels to Rome beyond the political and military similarities. A quick online search shows that ancient Rome celebrated some surprisingly complicated and flexible images of femininity and masculinity, much like we do today. It turns out that Venus, the goddess of erotic desire, and Mars, the rampaging, pillaging war god, were just two of many forms of these gods. Romans kept making up new versions of them over the centuries, establishing new names, rituals and temples. Soldiers of the Roman Empire sacrificed to Mars Gradivus—the marching god, god of good combat—but when Rome was not yet so big and powerful many people worshipped the agricultural god Mars Silvanus. He gave farmers good harvests and made them into good fathers. As guarantor of treaties, Mars Quirinus precariously held on to peace. Venus Obsequens—Indulgent Venus—was the ancient Romans’ image of the perfect wife, while Venus Genetrix, the pure feminine parent, brought out the best qualities of motherhood in her people. (Julius Caesar’s clan, the Julii, claimed this version of the goddess as their ancestor.) Some ancient writers say the city also worshipped Venus Calva—Bald Venus—for motivating Roman women to sacrifice their hair for the common good, such as during a siege of the city when women cut off their hair and wove the strands into bowstrings to fight off the invaders.

The ancient Romans believed the gods drove people’s behavior. Personified in statues, paintings, prayer and ritual, Venus Obsequens was healthy erotic desire. When you felt it, you knew she had found her way inside you. The paintings in this exhibit show these versions of Venus and Mars as I found them living in us today.

Follow our Journey

On the web: paulrutz.com
Instagram: @paulxrutz     @fordgallerypdx     #intoastudy

Bios

Paul X. Rutz paints pictures in oil on canvas and carved panel. A former Naval Officer and ballet dancer, he holds a Ph.D. in visual culture. His exhibitions include solo shows at the Oregon Military Museum and several academic galleries, as well as group shows at Mark Woolley Gallery and the Smithsonian Institution. A former reporter for the Pentagon’s press service, he has contributed to HuffPost, Modern Fiction Studies, The Smart Set, and Cincinnati Review, among others, and he writes features for Military History and Vietnam magazines.

Amanda Hampton Wray, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is an Assistant Professor of Communicative Sciences & Disorders and director of the Brain Systems for Language Lab at Michigan State University. Her research program examines relationships between cognitive and linguistic proficiencies and life experiences. Her work employs measures of brain functions mediating language and attention processes in order to understand the development of these skills in populations with typical and disordered developmental trajectories, including children who stutter and those with SLI.

Financial Support

Music

Courtesy of The Go! Team

Special Thanks

Ford Gallery, Portland, OR
Jason Babcock of Positive Science, LLC
Laura Annalora and Queens’ Suite
Brian J. Clark Productions
Dar Meshi, Ph.D., and Courtney Venker, Ph.D., of Michigan State University
Megan Heiy, Esq.

 

Songs for My Child. Songs for Myself.

Paintings by Jolyn Fry

A series of large scale paintings created in relation to healing from post trauma dissociation.

Opening Reception
Saturday, September 29th
6 – 9 PM

 

Journal entry…on painting 2015

Songs to myself…another chapter of work. All paintings in progress. All writing in progress. The end is nowhere in sight. The fundamental organ. Can’t separate the organ from the bone. There is no story. Color, line movement are all without thought..I find you in everything. I write to myself and I am writing to you. Now I feel hunger. I am your second half, third , and fourth. There is no whole.” six rivers the ocean…”my only hope is that if I keep creating looser, bigger, more, that the understanding will reveal itself without interpretation. My painting will become more real, more full for its lack of interpretation.

Songs for my child. Songs for myself is a body of work created during the last 15 years as a study of self. When I started these paintings and stretched the first large canvases I wasn’t cognizant of what there was to uncover. It’s been an unexpected journey. I knew I was lost and I understood wanting to use my painting practice to build a deeper relationship with self. But what I didn’t realize was how seperated I was from my actual body. Repeated rape, torture, and abuse experiences as a small child had really left me divorced from myself physically and emotionally.

My painting practice required hours of daily meditation in order to find the willingness to show up. Nausea and migraines became daily studio routines. I’ve laid on the floor and tried to surrender to the feelings of grief, pain and betrayal at least hundreds maybe a thousand times.

And I’m still not finished. I’ve done much of this on my own, and I’ve had help along the way. Talented therapists, acupuncturists, and body workers have patiently tried to help me untie these knots. Loving friends and family have reached out and supported me when possible.

I share this work and my process, because it’s important.

Everyday I struggle. Each of us does in their own way. I’m grateful for the time, space, and courage to find myself. And if sharing my process helps even just one other person in the way that it has helped me, then the pain of sharing this experience was worth it. Being alive is beautiful. Part of being a painter is knowing when to stop. There is always more to say, and there’s other paintings to be made.There is blank canvas there to hold my space. I think of these paintings as my pretty monsters. They aren’t about being raped. They’re essentially about who I’m becoming and what I experienced after, and some days in the best of moments, I hope my painting describes the peace of one single lovely instance of being alive.

Journal entry…on being a girl child 2018

Here the air is warm and thick. I walk around and feel like a fissure. A not there. I know at any  moment someone could grab and press in to me. And the groups of people are always pressing.

-side note. To feel like a little girl is to be a walking vagina. To be pressed into. Grabbed at any moment and taken. But maybe that would be ok if I could be warm and loved. Not locked in this cold cellar feeling less than. Crumby, not clean, in dirty clothes and worn out shoes, and at least today I have my clothes. Even my bones are cracked because of this stupidness. The shame of knowing that I’m less than. Especially in my vagina…which is no longer the same…and despite my constitutional quiet. Everyone will know and see that something was very wrong. Not with what happened to me. But with who I truly am.

Bio

Jolyn Fry was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. She graduated with honors from Pennsylvania School of Art and Design in 1996. Since moving to Portland, Oregon, the following year, she has exhibited her continually evolving body of work in many group and solo shows. Whether depicting literal, physical landscapes or abstractions of a more personal, emotional nature, Jolyn says, ‘Surrendering to my artistic process grants me the kindest perspective of myself and the life that moves around me.’ Jolyn is a mother, maker, teacher who works as an Art Educator at Radius Community Art Studio in SE Portland.

Journal entry-2004

On the day I was raped I was not alone. I became one with my sisters, my ancestors. I became nothing and whole at the same time. I became hate. In losing myself I became something I never was before. In losing myself in surrendering I became hate, I became animal, I became sex and rage in my very vulnerability I became humane. I was a child human. Human. Small and insignificant. And it wasn’t until today that I knew as I paint these paintings these pieces of myself, of women, these stories they become me and they become above and below and around me. It was yesterday that I was so sm…small so insignificant. as I am today, but I am all of these things at once small and big. Pain and joy. And I live. I will live. Everything up until this moment has been past. An unfathomable past and I live as life is meant to be for today for a moment with utter knowingness, and a trust that I have never understood before and today becomes a day just like any other day in any other lifetime and that is what makes me rise and fall. That is why I breathe and laugh and cry because of the insignificance of it all.

On view through October 24th

RSVP to our Facebook Event

Nathan Orosco: Wheel On Fire

Join us for a solo exhibition of installation & sculptural works by artist Nathan Orosco.

Opening Reception
August 26th
6-9 PM

This work is based on formal concepts of the wheel and its metaphorical representations of invention, dominance and economic industry.
Wheel On Fire is a way of stating organized chaos and predictable outcomes.

-Nathan Orosco

 

About the Artist

Nathan Orosco was born in Odessa, TX and received his B.A. in Studio Art at The University of Texas of the Permian Basin in 2000 and his M.F.A in Sculpture at Washington State University in 2002. He is currently an Instructor of Art at Mt. Hood Community College where he teaches sculpture and drawing. Nathan Orosco’s work has been exhibited nationally including exhibits at the Museum of Arts Culture in Spokane WA and the Mexic-Arte Museum in Austin, TX and is currently represented by Blackfish Gallery in Portland, OR. He lives and works in Gresham, OR.

Show on view through September 27th.

 

Prophet
bronze, copper, steel, stainless steel 14" x 16" x 67" 2017 $3700

Prophet
bronze, copper, steel, stainless steel 14" x 16" x 67" 2017 $3700

I Was Running
paper, glass, foam, plaster 2012 $6200

Moon Face Alchemist
bronze, copper, steel, stainless steel, paper, ink, yellow cedar 20" x 22" x 100" 2017 $4550

Moon Face Alchemist
bronze, copper, steel, stainless steel, paper, ink, yellow cedar 20" x 22" x 100" 2017 $4550

The Arrangement
bronze, steel, aluminum, piano 2012 $8500

Scales and Shells (photo series)
digital photo print 20"x30" 2017 $600

Timed
digital photo metallic print 20"x30" 2017 $675

Timed
digital photo metallic print 20"x30" 2017 $675

Miner with Light
bronze, aluminum, steel 2017 10” x 10” x 22” $4,800 (without pedestal)

*Works courtesy of Blackfish Gallery*

Dog Park

They put leashes on our hearts, walk our spirits, and run down the paths and sidewalks of our memories.

Join us in this visual celebration of the dogs that have curled up in our lives and that have contributed so much to our laughter and tears.

Fred Swan & Stan Peterson join forces to bring us – Dog Park – a gathering of nearly eighty pieces of work by 30+ Portland artists. Art, videos, stories, laughter, food, and fun. Come. Sit. Wag your imaginations and memories while we fetch your spirits back from the brink.


Tales in the Dog Park

Saturday, March 18th
1 – 3 PM

Join us for this storytelling event about the dogs that have curled up in our hearts and meet some of the artists of the Dog Park show.

The Ford Gallery is hosting an early afternoon gathering of listening and storytelling. We’re inviting you to see the Dog Park show and join us with a story about a dog that wags its tail around your house or in your memories. Stories should be 3 – 5 minutes in length and child friendly. Though an informal event, please try to arrive near the beginning.


Opening Reception

Saturday, February 25th
6 – 10 PM
Ford Gallery
2505 SE 11th Ave, Portland

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Alea Ahwahnee Bone
Alison O’Donoghue
Amy McLain
Brian Vegter
Chris Haberman
Denise Baker
Dennis Anderson
Diane Pinsonalt
Dianne Swan
Donald Brown
Fred Swan
Jacqlyn Sickler
Jennifer Feeney
Jennifer Griffo
Jill Mayberg
Kamala Dolphin-Kingsley
Karen Wippich
Ken Sellen
Kim Murton
Leslie Wood Kamman
Linda Robertson
Lisa Laser
Liz McDonald
Mavis Leahy
Mayfair
Nanette Wallace
Pauline Zonneveld
Peggy Pfenninger Reed
Robin Phillips Occhipinti
Robyn Lee Williams
Samyak Yamauchi
Sara Swink
Sophia Rock
Stan Peterson
Stephani S. Brockway
Sue Clancy

Divided We Stand – Portland Artists React to Post-Election America

 

Now that the shock of this unprecedented election has subsided, many of us are left with feelings of uncertainty and doubt. And while some of us would like nothing more than to curl into a ball and hope that the world continues to go on around us, others are gearing up for a fight.

Now we must decide what is truly worth fighting for. When those freedoms we hold most dear are threatened, how do we come together to protect those directly impacted by their loss, and to preserve those freedoms, not just for ourselves & our loved ones, but for ALL OF US?

Many of us no longer feel safe, now that the floodgates of racism & bigotry have been thrown wide. Civil rights, women’s rights, trans rights, marriage equality, immigration. Income inequality, health care, education, global warming. These are what’s at stake.

Let this be our rallying cry. Let us show them our hopes and our fears for the future of this country. Let us show them why we fight.

Featuring Works By
ACE TROY
ALEA BONE
BONNIE MELTZER
BRENT WEAR
CHRIS HABERMAN
CHRISTIAN HOOKER
CONSU TOLOSA
DAFNA STEINBERG
FRED SWAN
GARY HOUSTON
JIM LOMMASSON
JON WIPPICH
KAREN WIPPICH
LIZ MCDONALD
NANETTE WALLACE
REMEDIOS RAPOPORT
RYAN MCABERY
‘Love Trumps Hate Prayer Flags’ a collaborative project by SHU-JU WANG
Plus Live Music by THE FROGS

Join us and these dedicated local artists for an evening of solidarity & community, here at Ford Gallery!

January 20th from 6-10 PM

“All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.”
~Thomas Jefferson

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PLUS:
Ford Food & Drink will also be hosting Not Our President: Women Writers Against Trump from 7 – 9 PM!

“Now, more than ever, it is crucial that women come together and make our voices heard. When women join in solidarity and support one another, we create change. So please, come join us on Inauguration evening, the night before the Women’s March on Portland, as several of Portland’s finest women writers light up this dark, dark day and take a stand against Trump and the misogyny and oppression he represents. Of course, all forms of gender and genitalia are warmly welcome!”

https://www.facebook.com/events/358911947821326/

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Catching The Big One
by Dafna Steinberg

Rising to the Challenge
by Nanette Wallace

Acro-Thinking
By Remedios Rapoport

Very Convincing
by Dafna Steinberg

For All the Courageous Hearts
by Elizabeth McDonald

Tweet Twit
by Christian Hooker

Gentle Revolution Mobile
By Remedios Rapoport

Who's Pulling Your Strings
by Elizabeth McDonald

Con Artist
by Christian Hooker

Dilatation and Evacuation (I Heart Congress)
by Dafna Steinberg

by Ace Troy

I'm Lovin' It
by Christian Hooker

Tax the Rich / Live Love
by Remedios Rapaport

Pussy Power
by Karen Wippich

Love Trumps Hate Prayer Flags
A collaborative Project by Shu-Ju Wang

Love Trumps Hate Prayer Flags
A collaborative Project by Shu-Ju Wang

Calling All Nasty Women!
by Nanette Wallace

NO / "O"
by Nanette Wallace

¡RESIST!
by Gary Houston

Trump Noir
by Jon Wippich

9th Annual Big 500 Show

$40 Original ART Benefit

500 + regional artists create ART on 8″x8″ wood panels. 5000 + works of ART on display, a mere $40/piece!!!!! CASH/CREDIT/CARRY.

Event begins SHARP at 2pm, Saturday, December 10, 2016.
First Come/First Serve. NO ART will be SOLD before 2pm this day. Show runs through December 23, at Ford Gallery, the main floor of the Ford Building/SE Division.

Gallery hours Dec 11-23, 9am-6pm DAILY.

A portion of the proceeds benefits the Oregon Food Bank. FREE entry with non-perishable food items/Can Food. Proudly, this is our 9th year for this show, which has moved to this location from its high rise galleries at Pioneer Place (2009-2015).

Big 500 is a trademarked show by Chris Haberman Presents, produced by Chris Haberman and Jason Brown (duo of Peoples Art), hosted by Ford Gallery (guest partner, Ross Blanchard), sponsored by Oregon Food Bank, Pabst Brewing, Burnside Brewing, Ford Building, Portland Mercury, KBOO, Hardwood Industries, PoBoy ART frame shop and Chris Haberman Presents. Thank you in advance to the hardworking and dedicated artists, collectors and community of our beloved Portland, Oregon, and its devout appreciation for the creative culture. Go Big 500!! #big500artshow

Don’t forget to join & share our Facebook Event!video

Video by Danielle Kirby and Adam Bailey